Tag: Rome

Whatever happened to the Twelve Apostles?

Whatever happened to the Twelve Apostles?

Philip Kosloski | Jul 21, 2017

Jesus told his apostles to “go” and that’s exactly what they did, taking the Gospel to different parts of the world.

Before Jesus ascended into Heaven he said to his apostles, “Go, therefore, and make disciples of all nations.” Having a divine mandate to travel the world for the sake of the Gospel, the apostles didn’t waste their time. They immediately set their hand to the plow and began the difficult work of sowing seeds of faith everywhere they went.

So where did they end up? Did they “make disciples of all nations”?

Peter

It is traditionally believed that Peter first traveled to Antioch and established a community there. He did not stay very long, but he is often known as the first bishop of Antioch. After that he may have visited Corinth before heading to Rome. There he helped form the Christian community and was ultimately martyred in the Circus of Nero around 64 AD in Rome. Saint Peter’s Basilica in the Vatican is built on top of St. Peter’s tomb.

Andrew

After Pentecost many ancient traditions point to Andrew, Peter’s brother, as the Apostle to the Greeks. It is believed that he preached to Greek communities and was martyred at Patras on a cross in the shape of an X. His relics were eventually transferred to the Duomo Cathedral in Amalfi, Italy.

James the Great

It is held that James was the first apostle to be martyred. In the Acts of the Apostles it reads, “Herod the king laid violent hands upon some who belonged to the church. He killed James the brother of John with the sword” (Acts 12:1-2). He died in 44 AD in Jerusalem, but his tomb is nowhere near this location. After his death his body was transferred to Spain and is currently located in Santiago de Compostela. His tomb is the destination point of the centuries-old pilgrimage, El Camino, still popular today.

John

The author of the Gospel of John and the Book of Revelation, John was the only apostle not to have a martyr’s death. In Revelation he writes from the island of Patmos, Greece, “I John, your brother, who share with you in Jesus the tribulation and the kingdom and the patient endurance, was on the island called Patmos on account of the word of God and the testimony of Jesus” (Revelation 1:9). He died around 100 AD and is buried near Ephesus.

Philip

In the years following Pentecost, Philip ministered to Greek-speaking communities. Little is known about his adventures, except that he was martyred around 80 AD. His relics are located in the Basilica Santi Apostoli, in Rome.

Bartholomew

Little is known regarding the evangelization efforts of Bartholomew. Various traditions have him preaching in different areas. It is believed that he was martyred and his remains are currently located at the church of St. Bartholomew-in-the-Island, in Rome.

Thomas

The “doubting” apostle, Thomas is widely known for his missionary efforts in India. There is a popular story about one of his adventures that focuses on the conversion of a local “doubting” king. He died around 72 AD and his tomb is located in Mylapore, India.

Matthew

One of the four evangelists, Matthew is most well known for his Gospel. He preached to various communities in the Mediterranean before his martyrdom in Ethiopia. His tomb is located in the cathedral in Salerno, Italy.

James the Less

Scholars believe that Saint James the Less authored the “Epistle of St. James” found in the New Testament. After the apostles dispersed and left Jerusalem, James remained and became the first bishop in the holy city. He remained there for several decades until he was stoned to death by the Jewish authorities in the year 62. Some of his relics can be found in the Basilica Santi Apostoli, in Rome. It is also believed his tomb is located at the St. James Cathedral in Jerusalem.

Judas Thaddeus

 The “forgotten” apostle due to his name being the same as Judas Iscariot, St. Jude preached the gospel in various places. He is revered by the Armenian Church as the “Apostle to the Armenians.” He suffered martyrdom around 65 AD in Beirut, Lebanon. His remains are currently in Saint Peter’s Basilica in Rome.

Simon the Zealot

Simon is often depicted with Judas Thaddeus and some believe they preached together as a team. This is due in part because a tradition states they were both martyred in Beirut in the same year. Some of his relics are believed to be located in Saint Peter’s Basilica in Rome.

Matthias

After being chosen as the “replacement apostle,” one tradition states that Matthias founded a church in Cappadocia and ministered to Christians on the coasts of the Caspian Sea. It is believed that he died a martyr’s death, and was beheaded with an axe in Colchis at the hands of the many pagans there. Some of his relics are said to have been brought to Rome by St. Helena.

How long is Jesus present in the Eucharist after we’ve received Communion?

How long is Jesus present in the Eucharist after we’ve received Communion?

 by Daniel Esparza

“We have to pay proper respect to Our Lord”

The great treasure of the Catholic Church is the Eucharist — Jesus himself hidden under the appearances of bread and wine. We believe, as the Catechism states, that “In the most blessed sacrament of the Eucharist ‘the body and blood, together with the soul and divinity, of our Lord Jesus Christ and, therefore, the whole Christ is truly, really, and substantially contained’” (CCC 1374).

Additionally, this Real Presence of Christ in the Eucharist does not end immediately when we receive him at Communion time. The Catechism goes on to explain how, “The Eucharistic presence of Christ begins at the moment of the consecration and endures as long as the Eucharistic species subsist” (CCC 1377).

 

What does that mean when we receive him into our mouths? How long does Jesus’ Real Presence remain in our bodies?

 
There is a famous story from the life of Saint Philip Neri that helps answer that question. One day while he was celebrating Mass, a man received Holy Communion and left the church early. The man appeared to have no regard for the Presence within him and so Philip Neri decided to use this opportunity as a teaching moment. He sent two altar boys with lighted candles to follow the man outside of the church. After a while walking through the streets of Rome, the man turned around to see the altar boys still following him. Confused, the man returned to the church and asked Philip Neri why he sent the altar boys. Saint Philip Neri responded by saying, “We have to pay proper respect to Our Lord, Whom you are carrying away with you. Since you neglect to adore Him, I sent two acolytes to take your place.” The man was stunned by the response and resolved to be more aware of God’s presence in the future.
 

It is generally assumed that the Eucharistic species of bread remains for about 15 minutes after reception. This is based on simple biology and reflects the Catechism’s statement that the presence of Christ “endures as long as the Eucharistic species subsist.”

 

This is why many saints have recommended offering 15 minutes of prayer after receiving the Eucharist as a thanksgiving to God. This allows the soul to savor the presence of God and have a true “heart-to-heart” with Jesus.

 
In our fast paced world it is often difficult to remain long after Mass, but that doesn’t mean we can’t at least pray a brief prayer of thanksgiving. The main point is that we need to remember Jesus’ presence in the Eucharist stays with us for several minutes and presents us with a special time when we can commune with our Lord and feel his love within us.
If one day you forget, don’t be surprised if your parish priest sends altar servers to follow you to your car when you leave Mass early!

aleteia.org · by Daniel Esparza